?

Log in

No account? Create an account

전주 여행

« previous entry | next entry »
July 6, 2014 | 09:09pm
Mood: tired

Yesterday (Saturday the 5th) I went up to Jeonju. I booked my bus ticket online - I've done this maybe one time before and I will never go back. You can choose your own seat! It takes 5 seconds to get your ticket! No lines or stress!

Anyways, I went and met up with Minwoo. We took a taxi to Jeonju University, which is where I'll be studying Korean in the fall. Before we did any sight-seeing we got lunch at a Thai restaurant. I got nasi goreng, which, while being my favorite food of all time, was somewhat inaccurate in flavor/ingredients. Not a big surprise for a restaurant in small-town Korea. The area around the front gate of the university was interesting, though - everything was brand new. Most villas in Korea look exactly the same, but these were made of brick and looked kind-of classy. It was also completely dead - probably due to it being summer vacation. Oops.

After that we walked around campus, stumbled across a kickboxing tournament (half-dressed testosterone-riddled men! my kind of tournament), and walked. About 40 minutes later we got to his house where he got his car and we drove to the hanok village in an attempt to go Quiznos, but due to a lack of parking, we skipped that. We went to a department store, looked at bags, and got 분식 for dinner. We walked around Emart a bit before he drove me to the bus terminal. I bought my ticket with 4 minutes to spare, and the drunk dude who was sitting next to me moved to the back about 5 minutes into the trip, so I got the whole row to myself.

Some thoughts: the divide of new/old is even more visible in Jeonju than in Gwangju. In Gwangju, the new area is far to the north of the city, and considered quite wealthy. In Jeonju, it's toward the south-west, but it's a very gradual divide - you don't realize you're in the new district until you're there. Campus is nice but a bit spread out; not looking forward to walking to buttfuck nowhere to go to the gym at 6 in the morning. Also, the dorm I'll be living in is huge. Huge. I also thought it was weird that if you want to enter the library you have to scan in. Strange.

I'll give this for Jeonju: I think it's going to be a very different experience than Gwangju. It may still be in Jeollado but I'll be on a university campus in a rich area - very different than the older residential district I live in now.

Link | Comment | Share

Comments {4}

AnnaSerene

(no subject)

from: annaserene
date: July 7, 2014 05:09am (UTC)
Link

That's really cool that you've already become familiar with some of the differences and will get a new experience.

Twice I've seen university libraries where you need to scan your student ID to get in: at Korea University and at a smaller university in Osaka prefecture, Japan. I guess it's an (east) asian thing?

Reply | Thread

Adam

(no subject)

from: aodh
date: July 7, 2014 05:36am (UTC)
Link

I've been to two universities in Gwangju where you don't need to scan your student ID to get in. To check out books, yes, but to go and look at books or study... no. Maybe Gwangju/Jeollanamdo have different library policies? Iiiinteresting.

Reply | Parent | Thread

Random...

from: lorigrrl
date: September 17, 2014 01:30am (UTC)
Link

Hey, this is totally random. I was looking for information on when the gym at Jeonju University opens and your post came up. I teach at a hagwon in Jeonju and live near the university. I noticed you speak Russian... before I moved here I lived in Ukraine/Crimea/Georgia/Kyrgyzstan but my Russian is очень ужасно. My husband is a native Russian speaker so this is kind of a problem... Would you be mildly interested in having some kind of language exchange/ Russian hours? I hope you like Jeonju. I still haven't been to Gwanjgu but hope to get there soon.

Reply | Thread

Adam

Re: Random...

from: aodh
date: September 17, 2014 12:24pm (UTC)
Link

Hello neighbor! I have to admit, I no longer speak Russian very well these days... I can read well but my active skills are just about nil. I also need to focus more on Korean than Russian, and that takes up most of my time.

If you're seeking a Russian language exchange partner/teacher, why don't you go to the international education office at Jeonju University (located in Star Center) and ask them if they'd be willing to send a message out to the Russian speaking students? Most of the Russian/Central Asian students should speak Russian/English pretty well. Sorry I can't be of more help. If you ever need advice for what to do in Gwangju, let me know! :)

Reply | Parent | Thread